In every conceivable manner, the family is link to our past, bridge to our future.
— Alex Haley

Research Projects 

African American Church Members

Clever’s Oak Church

Clever’s Oak Church

African Americans holding membership at local churches — from Slavery to Reconstruction — is detailed. Details were gleaned from early church minute books, minister returns and membership rolls from local congregations. 

The information is abstracted and entered in databases or spreadsheets for easy access and analysis. This database helps to document the transition from slavery to freedom through the early African American Churches during Reconstruction.

Bible Records

Former slave holders often recorded the births and deaths of enslaved people within their family and in the family Bible.

Information from these family heirlooms is abstracted and entered in databases or spreadsheets for easy access and analysis. Using the databases, researchers may be able to identify additional family members by locating family groups and former slave holders.

Slave Quarters

This effort documents the number of former slave holders, slave dwellings and enslaved people of Fauquier using the 1850 and 1860 U.S. Slave Schedules. 

The information is abstracted and entered in databases or spreadsheets for easy access and analysis.

Voters Registration

The history of early African American voters in Fauquier County has been gathered from Richmond. Information is compiled within a spreadsheet.

Underground Railroad

Runaways, county claims, jailor accounts and published accounts have been compiled.

Education

Taylor High School graduates.

Taylor High School graduates.

The Freedmen’s Bureau documents early schools and teachers during reconstruction and includes details on schools in Fauquier County, from the Jim Crow era to integration. Information gathered includes:

  • School minutes and roll books

  • Teachers contracted to teach

  • Rosenwald Schools in Fauquier County